Get Paid To Write A Book

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
7 Days To Easy-Money: Get Paid To Write A Book ……………………………………………. 1
(Write A Non-Fiction Book Proposal And Sell It) …………………………………………… 1
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
7 Days To Easy-Money: Get Paid To Write A Book ……………………………………………. 2
(Write A Non-Fiction Book Proposal And Sell It) …………………………………………… 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS ………………………………………………………………………………. 3
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
Sell your book the easy way — sell a proposal ………………………………………………. 10
You and your publisher: a partnership …………………………………………………………… 11
Why write a proposal first? ………………………………………………………………………….. 11
How do you write a book proposal? ……………………………………………………………… 12
How to use this ebook …………………………………………………………………………………. 13
Work FAST ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
Can’t devote a week to writing your proposal? ……………………………………………. 13
Day One: What’s a book proposal? Get an idea for your book ……………………………. 14
Day One Tasks …………………………………………………………………………………………… 14
Task One: Look over four non-fiction books ……………………………………………… 14
Task Two: Work through the Idea Generator exercises in this chapter …………… 14
Task Three: Create a computer folder to hold your working files ………………….. 14
Task Three: Create a Work Log ………………………………………………………………… 15
What’s a book proposal? ……………………………………………………………………………… 15
Got an idea for your book? Great! ………………………………………………………………… 16
Start here to develop an idea for your next book …………………………………………….. 16
Idea Generator One: What you’re good at ………………………………………………….. 17
Idea Generator Two: Your past experiences ………………………………………………. 17
Idea Generator Three: Your knowledge …………………………………………………….. 18
Idea Generator Four: What you enjoy most ………………………………………………… 18
Idea Generator Five: From challenge to opportunity ……………………………………. 19
Checklist: Is this the right idea for you TODAY? …………………………………………… 19
Day Two: Develop your idea and assess the market …………………………………………… 21
Day Two Tasks ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21
Task One: Keep studying non-fiction books ………………………………………………. 21
Task Two: Develop your idea …………………………………………………………………… 21
Dispelling myths and a word about confidence ………………………………………………. 21
Myth One ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21
Myth Two………………………………………………………………………………………………. 22
Myth Three…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22
Myth Four ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 22
Today we’ll develop your idea and assess the market ……………………………………… 23
Note: your personal experience is valuable ………………………………………………… 23
Simple steps in developing your idea ……………………………………………………………. 23
1. Write down everything you know about this idea ……………………………………. 23
2. Make a long list of possible book titles ………………………………………………….. 24
3. Create a list of contacts ………………………………………………………………………… 25
Assess the market for your book …………………………………………………………………… 25
1. Visit large bookstores ………………………………………………………………………….. 25
2. Visit your library …………………………………………………………………………………. 26
3. Amazon.com ………………………………………………………………………………………. 26
Write a report on your discoveries ………………………………………………………………… 26
Day Three: Write the blurb and outline your book ……………………………………………… 27
Day Three Tasks ………………………………………………………………………………………… 27
Task One: Write at least three blurbs …………………………………………………………. 27
Task Two: Collect sample blurbs ……………………………………………………………… 27
Writing the blurb ………………………………………………………………………………………… 27
Your blurb helps your agent and editor to get a contract for you …………………… 28
Sample blurbs…………………………………………………………………………………………. 28
Sample blurb from: LifeTime: Better Time Management in 21 Days by Angela Booth ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
Sample blurb from: Making The Internet Work For Your Business by Angela Booth ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 30
Write your blurb in easy steps ………………………………………………………………….. 31
One: Make a list of the benefits to the reader ……………………………………………… 31
Two: Rank the benefits ……………………………………………………………………………. 31
Three: Write several blurbs, in various lengths …………………………………………… 32
Essential blurb add-on: the testimonial ………………………………………………………. 32
Outlining your book ……………………………………………………………………………………. 32
Start with a mind map ……………………………………………………………………………… 32
Create your outline ………………………………………………………………………………….. 33
Day Four: Research your book proposal, and flesh out your book’s outline …………… 34
Day Four Tasks ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
Task One: Create your research plan …………………………………………………………. 34
Task Two: Create a chapter outline for your book ……………………………………… 34
Research: How much do you need to know? ………………………………………………….. 34
Your research plan ………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
Work on your book’s outline and the first chapter, as you research …………………… 36
The Brain-Dead Process ………………………………………………………………………….. 36
What goes into your chapter outline? ………………………………………………………… 39
Will you need graphics or photographs? ……………………………………………………….. 40
Day Five: Write your proposal query letter, and submit it to agents and publishers … 41
Day Five Tasks ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 41
Task One: Start a contact list of agents and publishers ……………………………….. 41
Task Two: Send out ten query letters to agents and publishers ……………………… 41
Today you write your proposal query letter ……………………………………………………. 41
Do you need an agent? ………………………………………………………………………………… 42
Online resources to help you in your agent-hunt ………………………………………… 42
Sending your query letter directly to publishers ……………………………………………… 43
Yes, you can multiple-submit your query letter, and even your proposal …………… 44
Sample Query Letter …………………………………………………………………………………… 45
Another sample query letter …………………………………………………………………………. 47
Write your query letter! ………………………………………………………………………………. 49
Here’s a quick outline for your letter: ………………………………………………………… 49
“Don’ts” for your query letter ……………………………………………………………………. 49
1. Don’t make unsupported claims for yourself or your book ……………………….. 49
2. Don’t mention that you’re unpublished …………………………………………………… 50
3. Don’t mention that your partner, your best friend, or the milkman think that you’re a good writer or that you’ve got a brilliant idea for a book …………………. 50
4. Don’t be specific ………………………………………………………………………………….. 51
Day Six: Write the proposal …………………………………………………………………………….. 52
Day Six Task ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 52
Task One: Write the initial draft of your book proposal ……………………………….. 52
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 52
Relax! You’ll write your draft in stages …………………………………………………………. 52
Let’s write the proposal ……………………………………………………………………………….. 54
Your chapter outline ……………………………………………………………………………….. 54
Your background—why you’re the person to write this book ……………………….. 54
Write the Overview …………………………………………………………………………………. 56
Sample Overview Writing To Sell In The Internet Age ……………………………….. 57
The Internet gives writers unlimited new opportunities ……………………………….. 57
A how-to plus a how-they-did-it ……………………………………………………………….. 58
What I won’t be including ………………………………………………………………………… 58
Don’t hype, BUT DO INCLUDE EVERYTHING RELEVANT ………………….. 59
Your Overview’s length …………………………………………………………………………… 59
Write the Promotions section ……………………………………………………………………. 59
Promoting with money …………………………………………………………………………….. 59
Promoting with time ……………………………………………………………………………….. 60
Sample Promotions section Writing To Sell In The Internet Age ………………….. 60
My plan outline ………………………………………………………………………………………. 60
Write the Competition section ………………………………………………………………….. 61
Day Seven: Write the sample chapter and revise your proposal ………………………….. 61
Day Seven Tasks ………………………………………………………………………………………… 61
Task One: Write the sample chapter ………………………………………………………….. 61
Task Two: Revision ………………………………………………………………………………… 62
Today you write your sample chapter ……………………………………………………………. 62
A fast chapter-writing method ………………………………………………………………….. 62
1. Reread your notes ……………………………………………………………………………….. 62
2. Talk to yourself on paper ……………………………………………………………………… 62
3. When you’re ready, write ……………………………………………………………………… 63
Revising your proposal ……………………………………………………………………………….. 64
How to revise …………………………………………………………………………………………. 64
1. Read the entire proposal……………………………………………………………………….. 64
2. Slash and burn …………………………………………………………………………………….. 64
3. Add material……………………………………………………………………………………….. 65
4. Read for coherency ……………………………………………………………………………… 65
5. Revise for style …………………………………………………………………………………… 65
6. Copyedit …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 65
You’re done! ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 65
Resource: Sample Book Proposal …………………………………………………………………….. 66
7 Days To Easy-Money: Copywriting Success ………………………………………………….. 66
by Angela Booth …………………………………………………………………………………………… 66
Proposal……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 66
Angela Booth ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 66
Overview ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 67
The business writing market is invisible to most writers ………………………………. 67
Writers need this book ………………………………………………………………………………… 68
The book’s structure ……………………………………………………………………………………. 69
What’s not in the book …………………………………………………………………………….. 69
Angela Booth’s Background ………………………………………………………………………… 70
Quick Bio ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 70
Partial list of publication credits ……………………………………………………………….. 70
Web site ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 71
Why this author for this book? ………………………………………………………………….. 71
Competition……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 72
1. The Elements of Copywriting: The Essential Guide to Creating Copy That Gets the Results You Want ………………………………………………………………………. 72
2. Teach Yourself Copywriting…………………………………………………………………. 72
3. The Well-Fed Writer: Financial Self-Sufficiency As a Freelance Writer in Six Months or Less ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 72
Who will buy 7 Days To Easy Money: Copywriting Success and why? ……………. 74
My promotions plan for 7 Days To Easy Money: Copywriting Success …………… 75
My plan outline ………………………………………………………………………………………. 75
Chapter Outline ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 77
How to get the most out of this book …………………………………………………………….. 77
Week One: Start Your New Business In Just Seven Days! ………………………………. 77
Introduction & Day One: Getting Started ………………………………………………………. 77
Day Two: your portfolio, prospecting and marketing ……………………………………… 77
Day Three: Writing Longer Copy ………………………………………………………………… 78
Day Four: Public Relations Copywriting ……………………………………………………….. 79
Day Five: Specialist Copywriting …………………………………………………………………. 79
Day Six: Focus on Marketing ………………………………………………………………………. 80
Day Seven: Copywriting for performance …………………………………………………….. 80
Week Two: Your copywriting services marketing plan and more …………………….. 81
Week Three: Copywriting for the Internet …………………………………………………….. 81
Week Four: Writing bios (biographies) and creating your own media kit ………….. 81
Sample Chapters: Introduction and Day One …………………………………………………. 83
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 83
Can YOU make money freelance copywriting? ………………………………………….. 83
First must-do: get your client’s message across …………………………………………… 84
Second must-do: market your copywriting services …………………………………….. 85
How much can you earn? …………………………………………………………………………. 85
Day One: Getting Started ………………………………………………………………………………… 86
Your Day One Objectives ……………………………………………………………………………. 86
The brief, and your Writing Services Agreement ……………………………………………. 86
Your briefing sheet …………………………………………………………………………………. 87
Your Writing Services Agreement…………………………………………………………….. 88
(Sidebar) The copywriter’s formula: AIDA ………………………………………………… 89
Writing copy step by step ……………………………………………………………………………. 89
Step One: Research ………………………………………………………………………………… 89
Step Two: Prepare by getting a conversation down on paper or on the computer screen ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 90
Step Three: Brainstorm with word associations ………………………………………….. 90
Step Four: First draft: write it fast……………………………………………………………… 91
Copywriter’s How –To: Five Easy Tips To Write A Perfect, Selling Ad ……………. 92
Tip One: who’s the reader? (Or viewer, or listener if you’re writing for broadcast.) ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 92
Tip Two: Write an attention-grabbing headline…………………………………………… 92
Tip Three: Write the features first, then work out what the benefits are …………. 93
Tip Four: Don’t forget the response! …………………………………………………………. 93
Tip Five: Read it out loud ………………………………………………………………………… 94
Day One Exercises ……………………………………………………………………………………… 94
Exercise One: Write a brief………………………………………………………………………. 94
Exercise Two: Getting (conversational) words on paper: Tell me about your favorite pen ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 94
Exercise Three: Write ad headlines from the brief you created ……………………… 95
Exercise Four: Create the ad from the brief and headlines you wrote …………….. 95
IntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroduction
Sell your book the easy way — sell a proposal
You can get paid to write a book. It’s easily possible to make a fast $10,000, or even a six figure amount. You could even make seven figures — over a million dollars for twenty pages of text. It sounds incredible, but a fast seven figures is certainly possible if you have a HOT, hot idea or have had an experience that hundreds of thousands of people want to read about. In his evergreen book about writing non-fiction, Damn! Why Didn’t I Write That?, author Marc McCutcheon says that it’s not hard to make a good income: “you can learn the trade and begin making a respectable income much faster than most people think possible”.
The good part is that you don’t need to write your book before you get some money. You write a proposal, and a publisher will give you an advance, which you can live on while you write the book.
Writing a proposal is the smart way to write a book. It’s the way professional writers sell non-fiction. Selling a book on a proposal is much easier than selling a book that you’ve already written. A book proposal is a complete description of your book. It contains the title, an explanation of what the book’s about, an outline of chapters, a market and competition survey, and a sample chapter.
A book proposal functions in the same way as any business proposal does: you’re making an offer to someone you hope to do business with. It will be treated by publishers in the same way that any business treats a proposal. A publisher will read your proposal, assess its feasibility, cost it, and if it looks as if the publisher will make money, the publisher will pay you to write the book. When you’ve sold your proposed book to a publisher, your role doesn’t end with writing your book. You’re in partnership with your publisher to ensure the book’s success. If you do your part, both you and your publisher will make money.
You and your publisher: a partnership
The publisher’s business is selling books. The company acquires books which it hopes will sell, and sell well. Your publisher is putting up the money to publish your book, so you need to approach the project from his point of view as well as your own.
We haven’t got the space to go into great detail about the publishing business here, but you need to know about “returns”, because the challenge of returns makes publishing different from other businesses. Publishers sell books on consignment. Publishers ship books to bookshops, and if a book isn’t sold within a certain time period, it’s destroyed. The bookseller strips the cover from the book and sends the cover to the publisher for a full credit. This is the “return”. If a title doesn’t sell, the publisher takes a beating. As you can imagine, publishers are no more keen to lose money than you or I.
What does this mean to you as you write your book proposal? It means that your proposal needs to emphasize the ways in which you, as the writer, will take responsibility for the book’s success.
You will try to ensure the success of your book by gauging the marketplace. You will work out who the likely buyers of your book might be, and the reasons they will have for paying good money for your book. You’ll assess the competition for your book. You’ll work out ways in which you can promote your book, so that people hear about it. You’re in partnership with your publisher, and if you’re prepared to take responsibility for that role, the publisher will be much more likely to buy your proposal.
Why write a proposal first?
All non-fiction books are sold on proposal. A book proposal is much easier to sell than a complete book.
Here are some of the reasons:
 It’s easier to read a 20 or 30 page proposal than a 400 page book;
 It’s easier to make changes in the book’s concept at the proposal stage;
 With a proposal, the publisher, in the person of your editor, can take ownership of the book. It’s like bespoke tailoring: the editor feels that the book has been specifically written for the publishing house.
Even if you decide to write your book first, you’ll need to create a proposal once you’ve written it. No agent or publisher is interested in reading an entire book to assess its viability. That’s the proposal’s job: to ensure that your book has a niche in the marketplace. As you do your research for the proposal, you’ll work out whether or
not your book is likely to sell. You can shape the book at the proposal stage, much more easily than you can when it’s a huge stack of print or a giant computer file.
Sometimes you may get an idea for a book, but the idea is amorphous, it doesn’t have a real shape. You may want to write several thousand words to see whether the book becomes clearer in your mind. But write the proposal before you write more than ten thousand words, because your book must target a specific group of buyers.
How do you write a book proposal?
You write a proposal step by step. In this ebook, we’ll work on your book proposal together. Each chapter has tasks for you to complete. Once you’ve completed all the tasks, you’ll have a book proposal which has an excellent chance of selling.
Here’s what we’ll cover:
 (Day One) Getting an idea for your book.
 (Day Two) Developing the idea and expanding on it. Assessing the market. Who needs this book? What’s the competition for the book?
 (Day Three) Writing the blurb. Outlining your book.
 (Day Four) Researching your book proposal, and fleshing out your outline.
 (Day Five) Writing a proposal query letter. Sending your query letters to agents and publishers. (You send the queries while you’re working on the proposal. This helps you to gauge reaction to your work.)
 (Day Six) Writing the proposal.
 (Day Seven) Writing the sample chapter. Revising your proposal.
I’ll be including a sample of a book proposal for you to look at, so you can see what material the proposal contains. This proposal garnered an agent contract the first time I sent it out. I’ll also include other samples, so that you have plenty of templates from which to construct your own proposal.
How to use this ebook
First, read through the book, to see what information it contains.
Next, work through the book, chapter by chapter. As you read each chapter, do the tasks and the exercises in the order in which they appear. Doing them will help you to write not just one, but many book proposals. Remember, the primary aim of this book is to help you write your first book proposal and be well on the way to selling it by the time you’ve worked your way through all the chapters.
Work FAST
It’s vital that you concentrate on getting the words down on paper. As long as you have something on paper you can fix it. As we work through the material, I’ll be encouraging you to work FAST and not think to much about what you’re writing. Thinking has no business in your first draft. Thinking comes later as you rewrite.
Can’t devote a week to writing your proposal?
If you’re on vacation you can set aside a couple of weeks to work on your proposal. But what if you don’t have a vacation due? Easy! You can fit writing into your busy life. You’ll still follow all the steps, but it will take you longer. Try to stick to a set schedule. You may decide that you’ll complete a chapter a week, for example.
Work fast. Work on your book proposal EVERY DAY, even if you only have five minutes to spare. This is because at the beginning, ideas are fragile. Time spent with your proposal each day helps you to build and maintain your energy and your enthusiasm.

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